Friday Lens Affairs 178

Rotorua, New Zealand, Moari

Today I’m hosting a photograph of Maori statue in Rotorua taken by Laia from Dream Travel Girl Blog.

Originally from Barcelona, Laia lived abroad for 10 years before starting the biggest adventure of her life: a year-long round the world solo trip, a trip that was an internal journey as well.

She travels on a budget, slow and light; and enjoys going off the beaten path, walking without direction and talking to locals. At the moment she’s planning her next adventure. Do follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

Photo Story:  Rotorua, New Zealand

This photo brings back a lot of memories. I took it in Rotorua, New Zealand, a destination that left me speechless and wide eyed.

I had been travelling for over 5 months, one of which in New Zealand, and I still hadn’t seen anything alike.

It all started along the lake. Whitewater, bubbles, smoke, small ponds with boiling water and even boiling mud.

And it wasn’t only about the sights… there were also the sounds! It sounded like the city was breathing, I could hear gases and steams finding their way to the surface through narrow vents and pools.

It’s not magic, it’s geothermal activity. But even if I knew there was a scientific explanation, it seemed unreal, like taken from another world.

Of course, it comes with a price… the whole town smells like rotten eggs! After a while and don’t notice anymore.

After the lake, I reached Ohinemutu, the Maori village. The Maori revered that place (no wonder they thought it was magic) and nowadays Rotorua is one of the towns with more Maori population (35%). The featured photograph is from this village.

The meeting house is closed to visitors, but I could enter the church. That was, again, surprising.

Inside the Anglican Church, there are Maori wooden carvings! I met a lady who told me its origins. When the colonisers first arrived, the Maoris wished that their gods give support to Christianity.

That is why the church presents this fusion of cultures in its carvings and details. That definitely made the town even more interesting.

But apparently, I couldn’t have a perfect day. In the morning I realised I had my wrists, arms and cleavage full of small red dots. By the end of the walk, the red dots were really itchy.

I got worried and went to a pharmacy. They asked me if I was sleeping in dorms and got scared. Surely there weren’t bed bugs in New Zealand??

After some discussion, they told me it was probably scabies. No bed bugs, but some other kind of bug that I got in the dorms. I had to apply a lotion and wash all my clothes. Fortunately, in a few days, the red dots disappeared for good.

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15 thoughts on “Friday Lens Affairs 178

  1. There is a lot of expression on the face of this statue. It looks like it is eating a cloud. I would love to visit New Zealand.
    Ruth recently posted…Champagne: 9 Reasons to Visit this Region in FranceMy Profile

  2. Very nice. Love the photos and loved the story even more. Thanks for sharing and have a wonderful weekend.

  3. Wow! Sounds like a really neat place to visit.

  4. What beautiful place you show us in your blog. Great article and photo, too
    Photo(Geo)grapher recently posted…Poznań Old TownMy Profile

  5. much love…
    gillena recently posted…Monday WRites 98My Profile

  6. I too have been to Rotorua and loved it there including the geyser which came just as ordered. Luckily no scabies for me. It is certainly is an unforgetable place to visit.

  7. Enjoyed reading about the story behind the photograph.

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