Friday Lens Affair 233

Vancouver Mural Festival, Canada

This Friday I’m hosting a shot of a great mural taken on the Vancouver Mural Festival by Lisa Chavis and Cheryl MacDonald from the What Boundaries Travel Media.

The Girls are providing travel inspiration since 2007 and run another website with very useful travel tips called The Travel Pharmacist.

Do follow their colourful account on Instagram.

Photo Story: Vancouver Mural Festival

Colourful, eye-catching, and FUN! One of our favourite things to do when travelling is to find art in unusual places…on the sidewalks, on the walls, or in completely out of the way art galleries.

Strolling through neighbourhoods to take in free public art is a unique way to connect with the area.

Street art is a medium we really resonate with and this example of the collection in downtown Vancouver, BC is mind-blowing in its depth and composition.

As part of the Vancouver Mural Fest, the city’s largest annual free public art celebration, this particular work is part of the massive “Dance the Dance My Girl” mural collaboration done by the Mexican artists Irving Cano and Ari De La Mora.

Located at the north end of the Gallery Lane in Vancouver, it was created for the Vancouver Mural Festival in 2017.

The theme of the murals is the “indigenous Mexican people and examples of their vibrant culture”.

The murals are certainly vibrant and pull you completely into their world as though you’ve stepped through a time machine.

The Vancouver Mural Festival is organized by Create Vancouver Society, a Registered Non-Profit organization dedicated to artistic and cultural development in the Lower Mainland.

Through the creation of permanent large-scale public murals, they provide a platform for Vancouver’s diverse art scene to contribute to the city’s cultural legacy for years to come.

The annual festival takes place for a week in August in the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood and works throughout the year with neighbourhoods around the Lower Mainland area to highlight the local culture and vibrancy of their areas.

The average lifespan of a mural ranges from a couple years to decades, depending on location, weather, upkeep and other factors.

The City of Vancouver mandates all murals must stay up for a minimum of two years. Afterwards, some murals may be painted over if necessary, though the intention is to keep them up as long as possible.

Part of the power of the medium—especially with graffiti and street art—is the temporary nature of the works which allows them to take advantage of temporary spaces and provides the chance for artists and communities to reuse the same canvases over time.

Vancouver Mural Festival is organized by Create Vancouver Society and aim to create permanent large-scale public murals to provide a platform for Vancouver’s diverse art scene to contribute to the city’s cultural legacy for years to come.

The annual festival takes place  in August in the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood, and we work throughout the year with neighbourhoods around the Lower Mainland to highlight the local culture and vibrance of their area.

Do you love this post? Feel free to share it!

Check out rest of Friday Lens Affairs here!

Pepe Gaka Quapaw Mural, Hot Springs, USA  Walk the Walls Street Art Festival, Sydney, Australia

Pin Vancouver Mural Festival, Canada

2 thoughts on “Friday Lens Affair 233

  1. Jim

    Great article, really liked it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> 

CommentLuv badge